Migrant Journal—Issue 2 Wired Capital

Migrant Journal—Issue 2 Wired Capital

type—independent print publication, second of six issues
project team and credit—Migrant Journal; Catarina de Almeida Brito, Christoph Miller, Isabel Seiffert, Justinien Tribillon
year—2017

Migrant Journal is a six-issue independent print publication that explores the circulation of people, goods, information, but also fauna and flora, around the world and the transformative impact they have on space. While migration is part of humanity’s genesis, it seems the phenomenon has become ubiquitous, happening faster, with complex ramifications.

Migrant Journal aims at exploring the relationship between these elements, events, journeys and spaces bound under the idea of ‘migration’ in all its forms, crucial to understand today’s society. In order to break from the prejudices and clichés of migrants and migration, Migrant Journal asks artists, journalists, academics, designers, architects, philosophers, activists and citizens to rethink our approach to migration and critically explore the new spaces it creates.

The contradiction between restrictions imposed on the movement of people and the acceleration in the circulation of goods, services, money—in one word capital—boosted by free-trade spaces and mechanisms is reaching new levels of paradox and absurdity. The spaces and frictions this contradiction are the topic of Migrant Journal’s second issue: Wired Capital.

Europe’s recent migrant ‘crisis’ is a human issue and a financial one too—national communities grappled by a never-ending economic crisis and irrational fears of the Other want to halt unstoppable flows of people traveling their way, seeking safer lifestyles and economic opportunities.

At the same time, the US, Europe and China are seeking to create new transcontinental free-trade areas: free of boundaries, custom rights and quotas, where the exchange
of services and goods are facilitated. In post-Brexit UK, after a vote centred on migration issues, London-based financial institutions are afraid that they will loose their ‘banking passports’—the ability to trade freely with their European counterparts.

From a mega platform built in Asia exploiting oil in the Arctic Circle to the infrastructure of high-frequency trading, from Myanmar workers working in the Thai fish industry to Romanian posted workers in Germany’s meat factories, to globally-spread offshore accounts.

The contradiction between restrictions imposed on the movement of people and the simultaneous acceleration in the circulation of goods, services, money—in one word, capital—is reaching new levels of paradox and absurdity.

With Contributions by:
Dámaso Randulfe
→ AMPHIBIOUS CREATURES
Michiko Ito
→ MOVE TO WORK
Sophie Dyer & Eline Benjaminsen
→ SPECTRAL TOPOGRAPHIES
Shintaro Miyazaki
→ ALGORHYTHMIC HORIZON
Alexandra Voivozeanu
→ STRONG CAPITAL, FRAGILE WORKERS
Paolo Woods & Gabriele Galimberti
→ THE HEAVENS
Paulo Moreira & Pétur Waldorff
→ LUANDA’S PLEASURE RESORTS
Amie Siegel
→ QUARRY
Maya Ober & Magdala Goldin
→ POLARIZED MIGRATION
Justinien Tribillon
→ THE PANIC OF 1873
Saskia Sassen
→ EXTRACTION EXPULSION
Michaela Büsse & Jariyaporn Prachasartta
→ THE REMORAS 

Villa Carmen

Villa Carmen